Op-Ed: No One Wants a 'Porn Czar'; #NoProp60

Proposition 60 is not about safer sex or worker safety. The initiative’s approach is about power and control, and Californians should vote “no” on Prop 60 on Nov. 8.

MichaelWeinstein

For more than a dozen years, the AIDS Healthcare Foundation’s Michael Weinstein has been trying to elbow his way into the politics of the adult entertainment film business, and I have been following and providing news coverage for XBIZ each and every move along the way.

His organization started protesting in front of adult studios for the press brigades, beginning with the LFP offices in June 2004. But, later, the group double-downed its approach by initiating legislative attempts, waging lawsuits and filing complaints with worker safety authorities over condom-less porn productions.

Weinstein was successful, of course, with Measure B in Los Angeles County, after his group spent $1.65 million in efforts to convince a majority of voters in 2012 to approve the condom-requirement ordinance.  

But his ideas to overregulate porn with unrealistic protocols for filming sexually explicit content crashed and burned in California’s Legislature through the years, as well.

With his latest attempt, Prop 60, Weinstein has voyaged on to his most misguided pursuit of all, with his organization spending $1.4 million for the required signatures to put the initiative before voters.

It screams peculiarity only because the adult filmmaking industry hasn’t had an on-set HIV transmission in the past 12 years, but coincidentally during that time the industry has beefed up its screening services to ensure a safe and healthy work environment for all.

In addition to providing affordable, high-quality testing with a secure database to ensure performer privacy and to protect producer liability, the industry in the past dozen years has created strict protocols in the event of a positive HIV test.

Now, as Nov. 8 gets closer, Californians are getting a clearer look at what’s motivating such an initiative … because it apparently isn’t solely based on safety.

If passed by California voters, Prop 60 would allow anyone to sue the producer of an adult film that didn’t follow condom rules if state authorities fail to act on a complaint within 21 days.

Weinstein, who has for the past 12 years been uncompromising and dictatorial to an industry that has successfully been able to thwart infection outbreaks within its performer population, would effectively be crowned “porn czar” if the initiative passes.

Weinstein in all likelihood could get a cut of the judgments, and taxpayers would be tapped to provide reimbursement for legal services, as well.

Weinstein’s likely windfall would be reinvested in efforts to drive the industry underground and out of state and to make performers vulnerable to harassment and lawsuits. But, worse off, passage of the initiative likely would take away control of performers’ own bodies.

Again, Prop 60 is not about safer sex or worker safety. It is about creating a new private right of action and diluting what the industry already has set in place in regards to safety standards.

In those dozen years leading up to today, the industry has done a more-than-adequate job regulating itself and making performers safer and better informed about their health choices.

Read the full XBIZ article: https://goo.gl/Yz48rS