Porn, 'Sluts' and Playground Groping; Sex Education STILL Not Compulsory.

Porn, 'sluts' & playground groping; yet the government STILL hasn't made sex education compulsory.

Let's change that.

SexEducation

“I was 12, I got called a slag and whore not even knowing what these words meant”.

“I was told to take it as a compliment when a boy groped my ass without my consent.”

“I had big boobs in year seven and remember boys chased after me after school and grabbed my boobs to ‘see if they were real’ I was 11.”

These are just a handful of the thousands of experiences shared on Twitter last week by people recounting sexual harassment and even assault at school.

They were speaking out in support of our new petition, calling on the government - and in particular Education Secretary Justine Greening - to make sex and relationships education (SRE) compulsory in all British schools.

The evidence is not just anecdotal. A recent BBC Freedom of Information request revealed that 5,500 sexual offences, including 600 rapes, were reported to police as having taken place in schools over 3 years. That’s an average of almost exactly one rape per school day. Meanwhile, a YouGov survey for the End Violence Against Women coalition revealed that almost one in three 16-18 year old girls experiences unwanted sexual touching at school.

Against this backdrop, we desperately need to educate children about concepts like consent, respect and healthy relationships. But at present, there is no requirement for schools to teach anything apart from the basic biology of sex.

In order to be truly effective, compulsory SRE must cover topics like consent, healthy relationships, gender stereotypes, LGBT relationships and online pornography. But it won’t work in a vacuum. It must be delivered alongside teacher training, a zero-tolerance approach to sexual harassment in schools and a review of the current statutory guidance on child protection and safeguarding.

It's something David Cameron had seemingly agreed to address, following Telegraph Women's Better Sex Education campaign in 2013. But he later blocked compulsory SRE lessons - and we're still stuck at square one.

Meanwhile, fuelled by internet memes, music videos and internet porn, young people are bombarded with confusing and sexist messages about what relationships look like and how women should be treated.New research last year revealed that 40 per cent of teenage girls had been pressured into having sex.

One woman tweeted us: “Boy in primary wanted to grope me in playground, scared I looked to best friend who shrugged and said ‘if you love them, you let them’."

Something is terribly wrong.

There is enormous support for compulsory SRE. Teachersparents,students and experts all agree that it is necessary, as do cross-party MPs.

Read the full Telegraph article: http://goo.gl/HDg31F