Dear Teenagers: Porn Sex Is Not ‘Real Sex’

A new study suggests that 53 percent of boys believe the aggressive sex they see in porn is how people actually have sex. And a lack of sex education is to blame.

TeenagerWatchingPorn

Sex Education. Someone has to do it, but who? Whether it’s parents, the school system, or spiritual advisors, no one really knows who should take responsibility for these very necessary conversations, and no one is willing to take the reins. Heck, just last year the CDC gave America an 'F' in sex ed. Enter porn: it’s entertaining, accessible, and informative. Unfortunately, it isn’t entirely accurate—at least not in the educational sense.

Sure the sex is real, but the scenarios and behaviors are exaggerated for entertainment purposes. For example, slapping a girl on her bare ass and demanding the “bitch” pleasure you is not appropriate foreplay.

Porn is indeed fantasy but part of that fantasy is selling it as reality—much like reality TV. Real people sign contracts, give consent, talk about dos and don’ts, and then portray an elaborate version of themselves for the camera. Though most reality TV is staged and scripted, whether or not it counts as “real” is still debated among watchers. Similarly, porn scenes, whether scripted or not, are staged. This baffles some fans of the genre almost as much as it seems to confuse underage minds (who, legally speaking, shouldn’t be watching it in the first place). Labeling content “adults only” does little to deter curious young minds; it may even tempt them, daring teens to “enter” without permission.

As technology intersects with education, kids have unparalleled access to the internet. In some schools, tablets have even replaced textbooks. Given our tech-reliant society, kids are now more likely to prowl the web for answers to their questions. And naturally, adolescents entering puberty are curious about sex.

According to a recent study, 53 percent of teen boys and 39 percent of teen girls believe the sex acts they see in porn are realistic.

“A few of my friends have used it for guidance about sex and are getting the wrong image of relationships,” said one 13-year-old girl in the study.

Read the full Daily Beast article here: http://goo.gl/Ga1kkj