New Book Says Violent Porn Disrupts Healthy Sex

“Most pornography consumed today involves some form of physical aggression, verbal degradation or abuse, objectification or power imbalance. So, it’s only natural that frequent exposure influences young people’s idea of healthy sexuality."

ViolentPorn

Such is the premise of Walter DeKeseredy’s new book, Violence Against Women in Pornography (Routledge, 2016). DeKeseredy, the Anna Deane Carlson Endowed Chair of Social Sciences and director of the West Virginia University Research Center on Violence, delves into the impact the pornography industry has had on technology and how it has become more mainstream over time.

According to the author, the book is the first of its kind to examine the connection between violence against women in porn and violent acts against women in real life. [Ed.: the alleged connection. DeKeseredy’s book discusses and extrapolates from social science theory and anecdotal evidence, not research.]

“The pornography industry is this juggernaut,” DeKeseredy said. “To me, pornography is a symbol of how we view our women in our society. It’s a very dangerous thing. Is this how we want 50 percent of our population to be portrayed?”

While DeKeseredy acknowledges pornography has existed for a long time [Ed.: What is thought to be the earliest pornography dates to approximately the second millennium B.C. One would hope a college professor might be a tad more precise than “a long time.”], he argues that the increasingly mainstream nature of the material and technological advances make it increasingly difficult for those who watch porn to delineate between reality and fantasy. [Ed.: The author touches briefly on the potentially disruptive nature of virtual reality, but the technology was not on the market when the book went to press.]

In the 1980s, DeKeseredy said, pornography was largely constructed as features with music and titles similar to mainstream movies. But today’s pornography, available in the form of streaming videos online, provides viewers with a stripped-down experience that is short on story and long on gratuitous violence.

“The producer will say, ‘take your clothes off,’ or make sexist comments and a man walks in and they start having sexual relations primarily around his desires,” DeKeseredy said. “It’s so real. There’s no script. There’s nothing. It involves so much violence.” [Ed.: It’s called gonzo. It’s cheap to produce. It sells. The same holds true for reality-TV, but porn may be less violent, less abusive and possess more entertainment value.]

Read the full YNOT article here: http://goo.gl/D4PoHy